Inequality

  • Living in a poor neighborhood changes everything about your life

    [Excerpt, from Vox.com, "Living in a poor neighborhood changes everything about your life," by Alvin Chang, June 6, 2016.]

    June 07, 2016

  • neppc data

    Urban Connecticut's structural strain

    BY ARI ANISFELD Urban centers are the engines of Connecticut's economy. They are job-centers, entertainment-providers, and home to 18 percent of Connecticut's population. But they also face the largest gaps when it comes to paying the bill. In 2015, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston’s New England Public Policy Center analyzed the fiscal affairs of every Connecticut town and found wide disparities. 

    April 15, 2016

  • Racially Concentrated Areas of Wealth and Poverty DataHaven

    Concentrated Wealth and Poverty in Connecticut's Neighborhoods

    Wealth and poverty are highly concentrated in Connecticut — more so than in many other large metropolitan areas. And often, those neighborhoods are racially and economically segregated from each other.

    August 31, 2015

  • Connecticut Data Map: Inequality and Neighborhood Income, 1980-2013

    Income inequality between CT neighborhoods grows. Source: US Census and Neighborhood Change Database, tract-level. Income categories derived from average family income and pct population in poverty.

    August 26, 2015

  • Racially Concentrated Areas of Poverty Connecticut Data by DataHaven

    Connecticut Data Map: Racially and Economically Segregated Areas, 2012

    Connecticut not only has the highest per capita income in the nation and ties New York in income disparity, its pockets of wealth and poverty are more highly concentrated than in many other large metropolitan areas.

    August 26, 2015

  • Data show Connecticut remains segregated, but work being done to lessen it

    [Excerpt] "Connecticut not only has the highest per capita income in the nation and ties New York in income disparity, its pockets of wealth and poverty are more highly concentrated than in many other large metropolitan areas. That was one of the findings of a study by Mark Abraham and Mary Buchanan, of DataHaven in New Haven, whose mission is to help policy-makers

    July 04, 2015

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